Beach Day by Rodger Bliss
October 2020
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Two Boxes

Two boxes are labeled “A” and “B”.

A sign on box A says “The sign on box B is true and the gold is
in box A.”

A sign on box B says “The sign on box A is false and the gold is
in box A.”

2 boxes

Assuming there is gold in one of the boxes, which box contains
the gold?

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18 guesses to Two Boxes


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  • anant

    I think it is box B

  • Rob W

    I think it is not possible to guess! (one of us three must be right now!)

  • Sili

    Both of the boxes?

  • Robin Sparkles

    Box b

  • Navneet

    Answer – Box B

    Both the signs on boxes A & B contradict each other and logically cannot be true. so the gold is in BOX B

  • Dude

    Rob W is correct.

    The problem cannot be solved with the information given.

    The following argument can be made: If the statement on box A is true, then the statement on box B is true, since that is what the statement on box A says. But the statement on box B states that the statement on box A is false, which contradicts the original assumption. Therefore, the statement on box A must be false. This implies that either the statement on box B is false or that the gold is in box B. If the statement on box B is false, then either the statement on box A is true (which it cannot be) or the gold is in box B. Either way, the gold is in box B.

    However, there is a hidden assumption in this argument: namely, that each statement must be either true or false. This assumption leads to paradoxes, for example, consider the statement: “This statement is false.” If it is true, it is false; if it is false, it is true. The only way out of the paradox is to deny that the statement is either true or false and label it meaningless instead. Both of the statements on the boxes are therefore meaningless and nothing can be concluded from them. Common sense dictates that this problem cannot be solved with the information given. After all, how can we deduce which box contains the gold simply by reading statements written on the outside of the box? Suppose we deduce that the gold is in box B by whatever line of reasoning we choose. What is to stop us from simply putting the gold in box A, regardless of what we deduced?

    You are today’s winner.

  • Rob W

    That’s exactly what I said!

  • Dude

    I said you were the winner, Rob W.

  • Someone essentially help to make significantly posts I would state. This is the first time I frequented your web page and so far? I amazed with the analysis you made to make this actual put up incredible. Great job!

  • Daniel McShortland

    A has gold because B tells truth

  • Taylor S

    It is in box A because box B does not mention anything about itself only about A.

  • Taylor S

    It is in box A because box B does not mention anything about itself only about A…….

  • Christopher

    Box A

  • Chad

    Box A

    Both statements said it’s in box a